Wednesday, February 17, 2010

"hell yes"

This is a fun promo for the first season of Lost—supposedly all the clues to the final season were there in the first . . .


But now to last night's episode . . . don't continue reading if you haven't seen it yet . . .



So Smokey is recruiting . . . Alpert can't be killed by him either, apparently. Nice Smokey-eye view camera work, too.

The numbers represent each of our favorite Losties, all "candidates" for the role of Island protector, according to Smokey. "Protection from what?" asks Sawyer. Smokey obfuscates, but the obvious answer is, "From me, of course." I wonder if Ilana and her crew were scouts for Jacob, looking for candidates.

I have been feeling for quite a while that Jack and Sawyer might be involved in an ultimate Island smack-down. We'll see . . .

Nice numbers tie-in. Could they correspond to each of our favorite passenger's seat numbers? I'm sure that Jacob's numbers are multi-functional (they are on the hatch, radio tower broadcast, Hurley's lottery ticket, etc., etc.)

A delicious moment when Sawyer told Smokey he knew he wasn't Locke. Duh! No one can cut through all the crap and sum things up quite like Sawyer.

Also, nice eulogy Ben.

I have to say that I'm also loving the sideways universe. Locke coming to terms with his situation and able to realize his true love with Helen. Hurley just being happy-go-very-lucky. Ben and Locke as high school teachers—School of Rock! It was great seeing Rose, but sad realizing that she was still sick. Sigh. The more that they show this reality, however, the less likely it seems that it will coincide with the Island reality. We'll see . . .

The absolute creepiest moment for me was when Smokey was chasing the young Jacob across the Island and young Jacob scolded him, saying that he couldn't " . . . break the rules, he mustn't kill him (Sawyer)." For a moment it felt like the show boiled down to just a couple of bratty kids playing god with people's lives in some stupid game with made-up rules. That would be a really bad way to solve the mysteries of the Island. But after the commercial break it was clear that the black stone and white stone rivalry went deeper than that. Smokey told Sawyer the Island was just an island. Richard Alpert told Sawyer not to believe anything Smokey said. These two may have been playing this "game" a very, very long time, but the stakes seem a lot higher than just a game. We'll see . . .

3 comments:

Post a Comment